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Full text of "Announcement"

c 

Icr9u.Zhm 
1899/1900 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



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HOMOEOPATHIC 
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

University of Iowa 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1899 ^1900 ^a 

> 



a. 




WILMOT H. DICKINSON. 



Since the last Announcement was issued, the Department has sus- 
tained a loss, in the death of Dr. W. H. Dickinson, that seems 
irreparable. No man in Iowa had more to do with building up our 
college, and attracting to it the support of the profession than he. 
His colleagues take this opportunity to put on record their love and 
aff ection for him, and to express sorrow at what seems to be his un- 
timely taking away. 

He was born at Stanstead Junction, Quebec, September 19th, 1828. 
Graduated from the Cleveland Homoeopathic Medical College, in 
1858, and again from the New York Homoeopathic Medical College 
in 1865. He became Professor of Theory and Practice, and Clinical 
Medicine, in this Department in 1877, and Dean in 1892. He died in 
Des Moines, Iowa, October 26th, 1898, after a long and painful illness. 



Twenty-Third Annual Announcemen' 



of THE 



HOMEOPATHIC 
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



State University of Iowa 



IOWA CITY, IOWA 



1899-1900 



Published by the University 
i8 99 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY AND ASSISTANTS. 



Amos N. Currier, A. M., hh. D., 

Acting President. 

James G. Gilchrist, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Surgical Gynecology, and Registrar of the 
Faculty. 

Charges H. Cogsweix, M. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. 

Frank J. Newberry, M. S., M. D., O. et A. Chir., 

Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, and Paedology. 

George Royae, M. d., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Philip B. Triem, A. M., M. D., 

Acting Professor of Theory and Practice. 



Theodore h. Hazard, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica. 

Fred J. Becker, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Surgery. 



Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology. 

Al^PHEUS Iv. POLLARD, M. D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics. 



Mary A. Raff, 

Matron. 

BlGEI/OW P. Bl,ACKSTONE, M. D., 
House Surgeon. 

Leora Johnson, M. D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Surgery 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTORS FROM THE MEDICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 

John W. Harriman, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

EGBERT W. Rockwood, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. 

Walter L. Bierring, M. D., 

Professor of Pathology. 

William R. Whiteis, M. S., M. D., 

Professor of Histology. 

Lee Wallace Dean, M. S., M. D., 

Professor of Physiology. 

W. E. Barlow, B. A., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

John Thomas McClintock, A. B., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Wilber John Teeters, B. S., Ph. C, 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

Gershom H. Hill, A. B., M. D., 

(Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane at Independence). 
Lecturer on Insanity. 



Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The; twenty-third annual course of instruction will open on 
Wednesday, September 13, 1899 and close on Tuesday, March 27, 1900. 
The opening lecture will be given by Professor Gilchrist at 4 p. m., in 
the amphitheatre. The course of study extends over four years. 
Men and women are admitted on equal terms, no distinction whatever 
being made between them. The large and well equipped laboratories 
in the University, the hospital facilities afforded by the union of the 
college and hospital under one roof, and the opportunity for collateral 
study in any department of literature or science, furnish facilities for 
securing an education in medicine not to be surpassed. Furthermore, 
a diploma from a University of the first rank has a value that does not 
attach to that of any private school. 

A course has been authorized continuing over six years, which will 
enable the student to obtain the degree of B. S., in addition to the 
medical degree. See Combined Scientific and Medical Course on page 
34 of the University Catalogue. 

ADMISSION. 

The requirements for admission are the same as in all the professional 
departments of the University, viz: the possession of a diploma from 
a high school approved by the University, or some equivalent, as the 
completion of the Freshman year in a college of letters of approved 
standing, with a sufficient knowledge of L,atin. Failing in these re- 
quirements, the applicant for admission to the Freshman class must 
pass an examination in English scholarship and Latin sufficient to 
admit to the Freshman class in the Collegiate Department. Appli- 
cants for admission to advanced standing must present evidence that 
they have attended one or more sessions in a reputable medical col- 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 5 

lege and will be admitted to such class as they may prove themselves 
qualified to cuter. All applicants for admission will apply to the 
examining committee in the President's office, on Tuesday or Wednes- 
day, September 12 or 13, 1899. If admitted, they will then report for 
enrollment and assignment of seats at the Registrar's office in the 
Homoeopathic Medical Building on Dubuque street. All fees must be 
paid to the Secretary of the Board of Regents, and to him only. 

Advancement to higher classes is secured only by examination, oral 
and written, combined with the quiz record and class standing. An 
average of 65 per cent must be secured in any one study to pass that 
chair; an average of 75 per cent in all the examinations is necessary 
to pass to a higher class, and to secure a degree. A failure to pass in 
two or more studies will stop advancement until the conditions are 
satisfied. A failure in one study will not stop advancement, but the 
student must pass a satisfactory examination in that study before the 
close of the year to which he is promoted. The Faculty reserves the 
right to determine the class which any student shall enter, in the case 
of applicants who have had one or more years in other medical schools. 

Graduates in science or arts, also those with degrees in pharmacy 
or dentistry, from accredited schools, under the requirements of the 
State Board of Medical Examiners, may be granted advanced standing 
equal to one year's credit, on a schedule of studies to be determined 
in each case. 

Graduates of non-homoeopathic medical colleges may be admitted as 
graduate students, as follows: If an adeundem degree is sought they 
must matriculate in the University, pay a lecture fee and an examina- 
tion fee, and pass an examination in the therapeutics of the branches 
taught in this Department. If a degree is not sought, a matriculation 
fee is to be paid, and such laboratory expenses as may be necessary, 
together with a lecture fee, if a full course is taken. 

Alumni of this school will be admitted to all lectures and clinics 
free of charge. 

By order of the Board of Regents no student will be enrolled until 
all necessary fees have been paid. 

In case any student is unable to pay the fees at the proper time, 
such student may, on application to the Dean of the Department, be 
granted an extension for a short time. 



6 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Students who do not pay the proper fees or avail themselves of the 
provision above mentioned, will be suspended from the Department 
until such fees are paid. 

TUITION FEES. 

The fee for tuition is sixty-five dollars ($65) for each year, of which 
forty dollars ($40) is payable on or before October 1st, and the remain- 
der on or before January 10th. There are no extra fees whatever, but 
for each laboratory course in chemistry, there is required a deposit 
of $3, to cover breakage, and to insure the return of all keys at the 
close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is re- 
turned to the student. 

The Combined Course in which the degrees of B. S. and M. D. are 
secured in six years, requires two years in the Collegiate Department, 
for which the fee is $25 a year. On completion of the Sophomore 
year, the student enters the Freshman class in medicine, and the fee 
is $75 for each of the last four years of the course. 

The above statement of fees is now in effect, and will apply to all 
students in the Department, irrespective of the date of matriculation. 



OUTLINE OF THE PLAN OF INSTRUCTION. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Chemistry. This subject is studied through the Freshman year. 
The course consists of lectures and laboratory work. The lectures 
treat first of the general principles of the science; then the subjects of 
interest to the student of medicine are discussed. Especial attention 
is paid to the compounds found in the body, with their functions and 
chemical changes. Poisonous substances and such as are of value in 
practical work are also considered. In the laboratory the student be- 
gins with tests for metals, particularly the poisonous ones, and passes 
to the analysis of complex substances. He learns the methods of 
manipulation, and becomes familiar with the properties and actions 
of reagents. The sanitary examination of water follows, with the 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 7 

analysis of a variety of pure and polluted specimens. The course is 
concluded with the methods of quantitative analysis which are of 
most value to the medical practitioner. 

Text-books: Simon, Roscoe, and Schorlemmer. 

Anatomy. The work in anatomy for the Freshman year will be 
the study of bones and joints with final examinations on these topics 
at the close of the term. The anatomy of the intestinal tract and 
accessory organs will be considered, but this subject will not be com- 
pleted until the Sophomore year. Two dissections are required in 
this year, with examinations at the close. 

Text-book : Gray . 

Physiology. In this subject the inductive method will be very 
largely employed in imparting instruction. The lectures will be illus- 
trated by diagrams, charts, and by experiments upon the lower 
animals. The relations between physiology and medical diagnosis 
will be presented to the student. During the first year lectures will 
cover the following subjects: General physiology, proximate princi- 
ples, digestion, absorption, circulation, respiration, excretion, and the 
general physiology of the nervous system. The lectures upon these 
subjects will be thorough. At the close of the session there will be 
an examination, which must be passed before the student can take up 
the second year's work in physiology. 

Text-books: Landlois and Stirling, Stewart, Kirke, Foster, Amer- 
ican Text Book. 

Histology. The work in this subject runs through the Fresh- 
man year. One lecture a week will be given, many of them being 
illustrated by means of the stereopticon. Two hours each week are 
devoted to laboratory work in the new histological laboratory, which 
is commodious, well-lighted, and supplied with thirty-six new com- 
pound microscopes, with all necessary accessories, dissecting micro- 
scopes, microtomes of various kinds, injecting apparatus, turn-table, 
etc. 

Each student is furnished with microscope, reagents, and apparatus; 
is taught the use of the microscope; and demonstrates, or has demon- 
strated before him, the general technique of the subject of histology, 
hardening, embedding, sectioning, staining, mounting, etc. 



8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Histological injections are made before the class. During the term 
the student prepares for himself a series of slides, illustrating the 
ultimate distribution of the blood, and cellular structure of normal 
tissues and organs. 

Text-book: Klein's Manual of Histology. 

Organon of the Healing Art. Ten lectures on the Organon will be 
given, with a view to presenting the teachings of Hahnemann on the 
causes of disease, on methods of proving remedies, on examining the 
case for therapeutic purposes, as well as on the principles of homoe- 
opathy and the application of the law of similars. 

Pharmacology. One hour a week for half of the year will be devoted 
to the study of the preparation and preservation of drugs, and thera- 
peutic appliances. 

Materia Medica. After the Thanksgiving recess, there will be one 
recitation a week on symptomatology in which Dewey's Essentials of 
Materia Medica will be used as a text-book. There will be an examina- 
tion on this subject at the close of the year. 

Minor Surgery. Throughout the year, one hour a week, will be 
used in teaching minor surgery, including the minor surgical opera- 
tions, use of instruments, and care of the same. An examination will 
be held at the close of the year. 

Clinics. The various clinical lectures are open to Freshmen, who 
should attend them, as far as their time will allow. It is desirable 
that they attend them as regularly as possible, but attendance is not 
made compulsory. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Anatomy. The work of the Freshman year will be thoroughly and 
carefully reviewed, and in addition the anatomy of the genito-urinary 
organs, the nervous system, and that of the special senses, will be 
systematically presented. The teaching will be objective, and every 
care will be taken to present the subjects in a manner to secure the 
best results. Two dissections are also required during this year, thus 
making four in the two years. Further advancement may be secured 
by an examination on all the work of the year. 

Physiology. During the second year a careful review of the sub- 



HOMCKOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 9 

jedts treated during the first year will be made. The physiology of 
the nervous system, the function of generation, and the special senses 
will be thoroughly and comprehensively taught. Final examinations 
will be held at the close of the year. 
Text-books: The same as in Freshman year. 

Chemistry. In the Sophomore year physiological chemistry is taken 
up. The lectures are in explanation and amplification of the labora- 
tory work. The latter includes the study of the proximate principles 
of the body and their chemical changes; artificial digestion experi- 
ments, with the isolation and study of their products; the properties 
of the constituents of the blood; the methods of testing stains; and the 
qualitative and quantitative analysis of urine. The course is com- 
pleted by the identification of urinary sediments and calculi. 

Text-books: Rockwood's Laboratory Manual, Vaughan and Novy. 

Pathology and Bacteriology. The course in pathology and bacteri- 
ology in the Sophomore year is presented by means of didactic lectures 
and laboratory work. The lectures are devoted to bacteriology, and 
general and special pathology, and are illustrated by means of draw- 
ings, preparations from the medical museum, and specimens derived 
from post-mortem examinations. 

The pathological and bacteriological laboratory is situated in the 
west hall on the second floor of the Medical Building. It is thoroughly 
equipped with new microscopes of the most modern type, and all 
apparatus necessary for carrying on every form of bacteriological re- 
search. Each student is provided with a table, a microscope, and all 
necessary staining reagents. 

In this year the lectures are confined to general pathology and the 
elementary principles of bacteriology. The laboratory work consists 
of two hours each week throughout the year, is illustrative of the 
didactic lectures, and comprises the preparation and study of slides 
showing the general pathological changes that occur in human tissues. 
An examination will be held at the close of the year. 

Text-books: Pathology — Stengel, Ziegler, Thoma, Delafield and 
Prudden, Green. 

Bacteriology— Abbot, McFarland, Crookshank, Sternberg. 

Surgical Emergencies. Two lectures a week, throughout the year, 



10 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

are given on such subjects as anaesthesia, shock, hemorrhage, wounds, 
and traumatism, fractures, dislocations, and other related topics, 
which include conditions falling to the care of the general medical 
practitioner. These subjects are carefully and thoroughly presented, 
great pains being taken to give the student practical instruction. The 
course is supplemented by one lecture a week, during a portion of the 
term, on bandaging and surgical dressings of all kinds. 

Physical Diagnosis. Lectures are given weekly, throughout the 
year, upon physical diagnosis, contrasting normal and pathological 
conditions, particularly of the chest. This includes practice with 
modern appliances for reaching a correct diagnosis in diseased condi- 
tions. 

Materia Medica. During this year three lectures a week are given 
on materia medica and symptomatology. The mineral remedies will 
be studied during the session of 1899-1900, with weekly quizzes on the 
vegetable remedies. A brief review of the toxicological and physio- 
logical effects of the drug will be given, then the most prominent and 
characteristic symptoms. These symptoms will be grouped as they 
have been found useful for therapeutic purposes. 

Text-books: Organon, Dewey's Essentials of Materia Medica, Far- 
rington's Clinical Materia Medica. 

Theory and Practice. The teaching will be didactic and clinical. 
General and special pathology will be taught according to the latest 
investigations into the etiology and nature of disease. It will be the 
aim of the occupant of this chair to teach only that which has secured 
the sanction of competent observers, and which has been confirmed by 
abundant clinical experience. In teaching the relation of drug patho- 
genesis to semieology the well established principles of homoeopathic 
therapeutics will be closely and consistently followed. Attendance 
upon clinics will be obligatory. As the lecture-room is under the 
same roof with the hospital, admirable opportunities for bed-side in- 
struction are furnished. 

Text-books: Dickinson's Theory and Practice, Arndt's System of 
Medicine, Raue's Special Pathology, Goodno's Practice; for reference, 
Pepper's Text-book of Theory and Practice of Medicine, Stevens's 
Manual of Pathology. 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 11 

Clinics. The Sophomore class is expected to attend all the clinics, 
in addition to the work outlined above. No amount of purely didactic 
teaching can possibly compensate for the lack of clinical demonstra- 
tion. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Anatomy. One hour a week is devoted to surgical and topograph- 
ical anatomy, fully illustrated. This course is very useful as prepara- 
tory to operative surgery and as related to physical diagnosis. 

Text-book: Heath's Applied Anatomy. 

Pathology. In the Junior year the lectures are devoted to the 
pathology of tumors, and the special pathology of the different organs 
of the human body. The laboratory work, consisting of two hours a 
week throughout the year, bears a direct relation to the lectures, and 
comprises the preparation and study of slides showing the disease 
changes that occur in special tissues and organs, including a complete 
collection of tumors; embodying furthermore the study of the general 
characteristics of micro-organisms, the preparation of artificial media, 
and the mounting of slides of the different organisms, with special 
reference to the pathogenic bacteria that are of great interest to med- 
ical men. 

Instruction is also given in the technique of making a post-mortem 
examination. 

A final examination in pathology will be held at the close of the 
Junior year. 

Text-books: The same as in Sophomore year. 

Toxicology. Instruction in this branch continues through the 
Junior year. It is given by weekly lectures supplemented by quizzes. 
The action of the principal poisons is considered, and the antidotes 
for each are given. The methods of testing for the poisons are ex- 
plained and illustrated by experiments. 

Text-books: Wormley, Taylor. 

Physical Diagnosis. One lecture and demonstration a week on 
physical diagnosis will be given in continuation of the work of the 
preceding year. 

Paedology. Weekly lectures and recitations are given on diseases of 
children. The subjects taken up are the diseases of infancy, as well 



12 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

as early childhood, and while largely treated by the didactic method, 
clinical demonstrations are used whenever possible. 
Text-books: Tooker, Fisher. 

Materia Medica. The work commenced in the preceding year will 
be continued. Three lectures a week. In addition one hour a week 
is given to applied therapeutics, in which cases will be presented 
(hypothetical or actual), prescribed for, and the indications for the 
remedies used analytically considered. 

Text-books: Farrington's Comparative Materia Medica, and Dun- 
ham's Therapeutics. 

Ophthalmology and Otology. During this year the instruction in the 
diseases of the eye and ear is both didactic and clinical. Special stress 
is laid upon the diagnosis and treatment of those diseases which will 
most often present themselves in the work of the general practitioner. 
The didactic teaching is illustrated by models and drawings. The 
clinics are large and varied, opportunity being thus given to examine 
and treat the cases presented. 

Text-books: Norton, Buffum, Angell. 

Laryngology and Rhinology. Instruction is given in laryngology 
and rhinology to the Junior class by weekly lectures and clinics. Stu- 
dents are assigned cases for treatment, and given ample opportunity 
to become expert in the use of the laryngoscope, rhinoscope, and 
other instruments employed in the diagnosis and treatment of the 
various diseases. 

Text-books: Ivin or Brown. 

Obstetrics. This branch is commenced in the Junior year. The 
plan of instruction will be the usual didactic method supplemented 
by demonstrations, with wet and dry preparations, models and dia- 
grams, together with clinical practice whenever possible. Two lec- 
tures a week are given, with occasional quizzes and recitations. The 
scheme is designed to carry the student forward, after thorough 
instruction in the anatomy of the pelvis and generative apparatus, 
through ovulation, menstruation, gestation, and normal labor. Use 
of the various instruments is taught on the manikin, and every care 
taken to prepare the students thoroughly for dealing with complica- 
tions. Dystochia, and all forms of abnormal gestation and labor, are 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 13 

given in the closing portion of the course. The central idea is to give 
the practical preference over the merely theoretical. 

Text-books: Guernsey, L,eavitt and Lusk; Gran din and Jarnien, 
Obstetric Surgery. 

Gynecology. This branch is divided between the chair of obstetrics 
and surgery. Medical diseases of women are considered by the chair 
of obstetrics during the last half of the term. The surgical diseases 
are treated, throughout the year, by the chair of surgery by lectures, 
clinics, and demonstrations. 

Text-books: Wood's Gynecology, Southwick's Practical Gynecol- 
ogy- 

Practice. Theory and practice are continued during this year on the 
general lines already laid down. More prominence is given to clinical 
instruction, since attendance upon the public clinic is required. The 
clinical material is abundant and increasing every year; the number 
and variety of cases presented the last year were very large. Partic- 
ular effort is made to familiarize the student with such morbid condi- 
tions as he is likely to meet in his daily practice. 

Text-books: The same as already noted. 

Surgical Emergencies. This study is continued during the Junior 
year, a final examination being held at the close of the term. While 
all phases of emergency surgery are considered, particular attention 
is given to fractures and dislocations. 

Text-books: Hamilton's Fractures, etc. 

Surgical Pathology. Three lectures a week are given on the science 
and art of surgery, much stress being laid upon differential diagnosis. 
The clinical lectures are supplemental to the didactic instruction, and 
attendance is obligatory. 

Text-books: Gilchrist's Surgical Pathology, Adams and Chislett's 
text-book, or Fisher and Macdonald's text-book. 

Clinics. Attendance on all the clinics is required of Junior students. 

As will be found noted later, the students in this year will be ex- 
pected to attend the weekly meetings of the Johnson County Homoeo- 
pathic Medical Society. 



14 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In this year Practice, Obstetrics, Materia Medica, Gynecology, 
Ophthalmology, Rhinology, Laryngology, and Surgical Pathol- 
ogy will be continued, and final examinations held at the close of the 
term. In addition the following will be taken up in short courses. 

Operative Surgery. Operations on the cadaver will be made by 
each student. The operations will be preceded by a short course of 
lectures on the principles underlying operative treatment, and the 
legal, professional, personal, and social obligations and amenities of 
the surgeon. 

Applied Therapeutics. Two hours a week are devoted to the study 
of selected cases, with the purpose of showing the manner of selecting 
the indicated remedy. This study is carried on in the clinics, where 
students in this class are required to make diagnosis and prescriptions. 

Medical Jurisprudence. A short course is given on forensic medi- 
cine by a Professor of the Law Faculty, by appointment, and in such 
a manner as not to interrupt the regular work of the class. In con- 
nection with these lectures the legal status of the medical practi- 
tioner, as determined by the various State laws, will be presented and 
discussed. 

Insanity. Alienism and mental disorders, are taught in a short 
course of lectures, given by appointment. 

CLINICS. 

The clinics of this department are open to students of all the classes, 
but the attendance is not obligatory in the Freshman year. All the 
clinics are full; in some of them the capacity of the hospital has been 
severely taxed. The general arrangement and clinical system are as 
follows: The House Surgeon at the commencement of the term details 
two students from the Senior class as clinical assistants. One of these 
retires after one week's service, one after two weeks. One student a 
week is detailed thereafter, so that each Senior student has two con- 
secutive weeks of clinical work. The duties are to assist at all clinics, 
and to attend to all dressings in the hospital, under the supervision 
of the House Surgeon. This gives unusual facilities for practical in- 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 15 

stmelion. In the medical, eye, and ear clinics each member of the 
Senior class will he given repeated opportunities for examination of 
patients, and will he required to diagnose the disease and suggest 
method of treatment. The clinics are largely patronized, the numher 
oi cases and the variety being fully equal to the college clinics else- 
where. The clinics are held as follows: 

Medical Clinic. Thursday afternoon, service of the Professor of 
Theory and Practice. 

Surgical Clinic. Saturday morning, service of the Professor of Sur- 
gery. 

Eye and Ear Clinic. Tuesday afternoon, service of the Professor of 
Ophthalmology, etc. 

Gynecological Clinic. Friday morning, service of the Professor of 
Gynecology. 

Obstetrical Clinics. By appointment, service of the Professor of 
Obstetrics. 

Subclinics. The subclinics are held two or more times a week, to 
which sections of the Senior class are admitted, where opportunity is 
afforded all to make examinations in gynecological cases, and the use 
of various instruments of precision for purposes of diagnosis. 

Medical and surgical treatment, and nursing are free for patients 
entering the general clinics. Board in the hospital is furnished for 
$7.00 a week. 

Correspondence with reference to admission to the clinics or hospi- 
tal should be had with the professor having charge of the particular 
clinic, or the Registrar of the Faculty. Arrangements can be made 
for thejreception of a limited number of obstetrical cases, only between 
the 15th of September and the 15th of February. 

Dispensary. In connection with the clinics a dispensary has been 
opened, where the clinical assistants, under the direction of the Faculty, 
prescribe for and visit out-patients, as well as attend such cases of 
obstetrics as apply. The dispensary is growing in patronage and 
influence, and has become a highly important and profitable portion 
of the work, affording, at once material for the clinics and practical 
instruction to the attendant. 



16 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

A training school for nurses has been authorized by the Board of 
Regents, the complete course covering three years. The first year is 
devoted to preliminary studies fitting the pupil for the active work , 
that is, as nurses in the hospital. Candidates for admission to the 
Training School must not be under twenty nor over thirty-five years 
of age, must have a common school education, and must present two 
letters of recommendation as to their capability, qualifications, and 
moral character. No other examination for admission will be re- 
quired. 

The first year, covering the preliminary work, begins and closes 
with the medical term of the University. A fee of five dollars will be 
charged, payable at the beginning of the term to the Registrar of the 
Faculty. The work of this year is entirely didactic, consisting of 
lectures upon anatomy, physiology, special nursing in diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose, and throat, and on practical nursing. For cases of 
emergency and home-nursing, this course is especially desirable. 
Aside from their practical work, during the second year, the nurses 
will have one recitation each week, and during the third year special 
topics for essays will be arranged. Those who have completed the 
preliminary work, at the beginning of the second year, may be entered 
upon one month's probation in the hospital, during which time they 
will receive board, lodging, and laundry, but no compensation. If 
they are found satisfactory, they shall at the end of the first month 
and during the remainder of the second year in addition to their living, 
as above, receive $8 a month for personal expenses, with a slight in- 
crease during the third year. This sum is not to be regarded as wages, 
the instruction given being in itself full compensation for all services 
rendered. Those who complete the three years' course will receive 
a suitable certificate signed by the President of the University and by 
the Secretary of the Board of Regents. The graduating exercises occur 
in connection with those of the Department. For further information 
address the Matron, Miss Mary A. Raff. 



HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 17 

BOARD AND ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Good board can be obtained at from #3 to #5 a week. By associat- 
ing in clubs, students may supply themselves with good accommoda- 
tions at a material reduction from the customary prices. 

Students will be furnished with all necessary information concern- 
ing rooms and boarding by applying to the Y. M. C. A. Information 
Bureau. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

To be admitted to the degree of Doctor of Medicine (M. D.) in this 
Department, the student must exhibit to the Dean evidence of having 
pursued the study of medicine for four years; must have attended four 
courses of lectures, of at least six months each, the last of which shall 
have been in this institution; and must be not less than twenty-one 
years of age. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Collegiate Department by which it will be possible for a student to 
complete the course in science and the course in the Homoeopathic 
Medical Department in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees of B. 
S. and M. D. See page 34 of the University Catalogue. 

HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAIv ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The Alumni Association held its eleventh annual meeting at the 
College Building, March 28, 1899, at which time the following officers 
were elected: 

President— A. S. Hansen, M. D., Cedar Falls. 

First Vice-President — L. W. Strubi^e, M. D., West Liberty. 

Second Vice-President — J. J. MetzingER, M. D., Iowa City. 

Secretary— B. P. Beackstone, M. D., Manson. 

Treasurer — Leora Johnson, M. D., Iowa City. 

Executive Committee — President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 

Alumni are urged to send their names to the Secretary, to be en- 
rolled as members. A small admission fee is required, the funds so 
procured to be donated to the hospital according to a vote taken at 
the last meeting. Alumni are requested to keep the Secretary informed 
of change of address. 



18 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

JOHNSON COUNTY HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

The meetings of this society are held weekly in the lecture-room of 
the Department, and have been very useful adjuncts to the instruction 
given. Senior students are associate members, and enjoy all the 
privileges of membership, except that of voting and the right to hold 
office. The Society has proved of the utmost value to all privileged to 
attend its meetings, from the fact that such topics as degeneration, 
heredity, sanitation (public and domestic), and many others, are 
presented by members of other faculties of the University. 

Officers for 1899- 1900: 

President— James G. Gilchrist, A. M., M. D. 

Vice-President — L,eora Johnson, M. D. 

Secretary — Ci,ara M. Hazard, M. D. 



Any further information may be obtained by addressing the Presi- 
dent of the University, the Dean or Registrar of the Homoeopathic 
Medical Faculty, at Iowa City, Iowa. 



GRADUATES, 1899. 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. 

Abbott, Edward C. Davis, Metta E. 

Blackstone, Bigelow P. Marble, Pearl Iy. 

Calkins, Fred E. McCabe, Fordyce 

Carver, Harry E., M. S. Metzinger, John J. 

NURSES. 

Smith, Estella C. Waite, Carrie I. 



ENROLLMENT FOR 1898-99. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAME. 


PRECEPTOR. 


RESIDENCE 


Abbott, Ed. C. 


J. G. Gilchrist, 


Iowa. 


Blackstone, B. P. 


A. L. Pollard, 


Iowa. 


Calkins, Fred E. 


R. W. Calkins, 


Nebraska. 


Carver, H. E. (M. S.) 


Faculty, 


Iowa. 


Davis, Metta E. 


C. B. Adams, 


Iowa. 


Marble, Pearl h. 


Thos. Phillips, 


Iowa. 


McCabe, Fordyce 


A. C. McAllister, 


Iowa. 


Metzinger, John J. 


Faculty, 


Iowa. 



Hamilton, Wm. A. 



Faculty, 



Iowa. 



JUJ 


JIOR CLASS. 




NAME. 




RESIDENCE 


Bishop, Alfred H. 




Iowa. 


Carmichael, Eugene 




Iowa. 


Coddington, James K. 




Illinois. 


Eilers, Paul E. 




Iowa. 


Hill, Alice L. 




Iowa. 


Hoskins, John B. 




Iowa. 


Howe, Marion A. 




Iowa. 


Lenz, John G. (Partial) 




Iowa. 


McGarvey, Anna M. 




Iowa. 


Rorabaugh, William E. 




Iowa. 


Schenck, Erwin 




Iowa. 


Winters, Rose De I,. 




Iowa. 



HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



21 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



NAME. 


residence;. 


Anderson, George W. 


Iowa. 


Babcock, Elmer 


Iowa. 


Blessin, Otto 


Iowa. 


Cross, George B. 


Iowa. 


Hubbard, Chester 


Iowa. 


KaufFman, Edward C. 


Iowa. 


KaufTinan, Ira D. 


Iowa. 


Launder, Frank T. 


Iowa. 


Little, Lowell 


Nebraska. 


Martin, Hobart E. 


Iowa. 


Maxwell, Adelbert B. 


Iowa. 


Musgrave, George J. 


Iowa. 


Parsons, Percy L. 


Iowa. 


Pond, Issi Otto 


Iowa. 


Richards, Frank O. 


Iowa. 


Sarchett, George A. 


Iowa. 


Snitkay, Chas. J. 


Iowa. 


Swallum, James A. 


Iowa. 


Wenzelick, George J. 


Iowa. 


Wilkinson, Landy A. 


Iowa. 


Winters, Louis E. 


Iowa. 


FRESHMAN CLASS. 




NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


Alden, Geo. W. 


Iowa. 


Beattie, Geo. E. (Partial) 


Iowa. 


Bower, Curtis E. 


Iowa. 


Carolus, Walter J. 


Iowa. 


Clapp, Archie B. 


Iowa. 


Cogswell, Chas. H., Jr. 


Iowa. 


Cooper, Wm. A. 


Iowa. 


Crew, Arthur E. 


Iowa. 


Edmunds, Clara 


Iowa. 


Humeston, Frank E. 


Iowa. 


Jackson, James M. 


Iowa. 


Jerrel, Alfred B. 


Iowa. 



22 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 
Klinefelter, Lewis E. (Partial) 
Lathrop, William C. 
McCusky, Wm. J. 
McDowell, Gilbert T. 
Page, Clarence V. 
Shurtz, Oneida 
White, Cheney L 
Woods, Samuel, D. E. 



RESIDENCE. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

So. Dakota. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

HEAD NURSE. 
Sara L. Graves. 



NAME. 

Smith, Carrie E. 
Waite, Carrie I. 

Blank, Mae E. 
Dunham, Elva M. 
Moore, Mary P. 

Conners, Jennie 
Curran, Alma 
Herrick, Nellie G. 
Watkins, Mac 

Ashby, Eleanor 
Ashby, Esther 
Coughlan, Carrie H. 
Edmunds, Clara 
Foster, Mabel M. 
Gay man, Leah M. 
Hull, Mrs. C. C. 
Price, Mrs. M. F. 
Pearson, Abby B. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



JUNIOR CLASS- 



PUPIL CLASS. 



RESIDENCE. 
Iowa City. 
Wellman . 

Walker. 
Manchester. 
Mt. Vernon. 

West Liberty. 
Washington. 
Mt. Vernon. 
Des Moines. 

Pilotburg. 
Pilotburg. 
Iowa City. 
Lenox. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Iowa City. 
Dysart. 



THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 
His Excellency, Leseie M. Shaw, Governor of the State. 

Richard C. Barrett, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Shirley Gileieeand, Glenwood. W. I. Babb, Mt. Pleasant. 
Hiram K. Evans, Corydon. J. D. McCeEary, Indianola. 

W:eeiam D. Tisdaee, Ottumwa. M. A. Higeey, Cedar Rapids. 
Aeonzo Abernethy, Osage. Parker K. Hoebrook, Onawa. 

Harvey Ingham, Algona. ChareES E. Pickett, Waterloo. 

George W. Cabee, Davenport. 



The University, as the head of the school system of the State, was 
provided for by a statute enacted by the First General Assembly in 
February, 1847, in accordance with the Constitution of the State 
adopted in the previous year. As at present organized, the University 
comprises the following departments: 

THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Students are admitted to this department from most of the high 
schools of the State without examination. The curriculum embraces 
four general courses of study, the Classical, two Philosophical, and the 
general Scientific; and two technical courses, the course in Civil Engi- 
neering, and the course in Electrical Engineering. 

The Board of Regents has accepted plans for an additional building 
for this department to be erected at a cost of over $150,000. 

There is no preparatory school connected with this department. 
During the year 1898-99 there were fifty-one professors and assistants 
I engaged in the work of instruction in this department, and the num- 
| ber of students enrolled was six hundred and fifty-nine. 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department extends over two years of nine 
months each, and on its completion the degree LL. B. is conferred. 

During the past year instruction was given by five resident profes- 
sors, who spend their entire time in that work, and by four lecturers 
of distinction in the various branches of law. 

The number of students enrolled in 1898-99 was two hundred and 
nineteen. 



THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department requires four sessions of six months 
each, and on its completion the graduates receive the degree M. D., 
and are recognized by the State Board of Medical Examiners. 

During the year 1898-99 instruction was given by twenty-one pro- 
fessors and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was one 
hundred and eighty-two. 



THE HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Four sessions of six months each are required for graduation when 
the degree M. D., is conferred, and the graduates are recognized by 
the State Board of Medical Examiners. 

During the year 1898-99, instruction was given by twenty professors 
and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was sixty-one. 



THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The full course requires attendance during three sessions of nine 
months each. On the completion of the course the degree D. D. S., 
is conferred, and the graduates are entitled to registration by the 
State Board of Examiners. 

During the year 1898-99, instruction was given by twenty-two pro- 
fessors and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was one 
hundred and twenty. 



THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department comprises two sessions of six months 
each. On its completion the degree of Ph. G., is conferred. 

During the year 1S9S-99, instruction was given by nine professors 
and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was forty-six. 



The total number of different students in all departments of the 
University during the year 1898-99 was over thirteen hundred. 

The University is well supplied with laboratories and apparatus. 
Among the former may be mentioned the Chemical Laboratory, 
recently erected at an expense of $50,000, in which building is also 
located the Pharmacy Laboratory; the Physical Laboratory; Labora- 
tories for Animal Morphology and Physiology; the Histological Lab- 
oratory; the Botanical Laboratory; the Psychological Laboratory; the 
Pathological Laboratory; the Engineering Laboratories; the Dental 
Laboratories. 

The Natural History collections contain very valuable specimens 
which are used in the work of instruction in geology, in zoology, 
in botany, etc. 

In 1897 the University lost by fire more than 25,000 volumes, but 
the libraries now contain over 32,500 volumes, the 27th General 
Assembly having passed an act levying a special tax for the rehabili- 
tation of the general library. This tax has made about $55,000 available 
for this purpose. 

For further information as to any of the Departments address, 

AMOS NOYES CURRIER, 
Acting President of the University. 



PRESSBOARD 

P PAMPHLET BINDER 



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